Sunday, March 27, 2011

Mission Statement

Who:  We are Ryan and Kim.  And you!  Please join us on our 21 Day Challenges!

What:  Together we will research, choose, and pursue a habit forming, enlightening challenge. We will share our reaction to each challenge in word, photo, and video form via blog!  We hope you feel moved to share your experiences with us as well!

When:  We will complete one 21 day challenge every month.

Why:  Our hope is that by pursuing challenges together we will experience life changing events, grow to learn more about ourselves and each other, and live a fuller, more incredible life!


-The Science!

When you dig down deep into the formation of habits and patterned routines in your life, you find that your behavior controls your learning. Neurologically, your brain is very adaptable and continuously forms and prunes (synaptic pruning) your neural pathways based on experience to achieve maximum efficiency. This process is especially salient in infants. When infants experience something new, neurological pathways are formed. The pathways strengthen as the frequency of that experience increases. For example, infants are experts at knowing they are hungry (because they're hungry all the time!).

Alternately, an infants neurological pathways are pruned when something they experienced only a few times, does not happen everyday. If an infant heard the word cercopithecoid last week from his smarmy uncle when shown a picture of a monkey, but mom always calls it a monkey, the kid's brain is going to prune the pathway connecting cercopithecoid to the picture.

Fast forward to adulthood. Although, it was once believed that our brains only had a critical period of time to form neurological pathways, Science (capitalized for emphasis) has recently found that our brains are mutable in nature even into adulthood, continually changing based on our experiences and grounded in the theory of neuroplasticity. Our experiences fundamentally change both the composition of our physical brains and the organization of our neurological pathways.

Running with the simplistic conclusions that these theories suggest, we can, fundamentally, choose how our brains develop using a little thing called intent. Kim and I have decided to run with it. We plan to organize our routines through planned repetitive experiences, 21 days straight. Join us, follow us, and decide to change your brains! Stand back, we're going to try Science!

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